asianartmuseum
asianartmuseum:

Love, love, love when our world collides with sci-fi. Here is Giger’s iconic Alien (RIP, Giger) depicted in traditional brush painting style, supposedly by Qi Baishi. Baishi was an acclaimed artist credited with transforming the brush art of China’s educated elite into a more universal art form embraced by all social backgrounds. In fact, we recently just wrapped up The Carved Brush, an exhibition of Baishi’s artworks!Anyway, here’s some backstory on this fantastic painting.

asianartmuseum:

Love, love, love when our world collides with sci-fi. Here is Giger’s iconic Alien (RIP, Giger) depicted in traditional brush painting style, supposedly by Qi Baishi. Baishi was an acclaimed artist credited with transforming the brush art of China’s educated elite into a more universal art form embraced by all social backgrounds. In fact, we recently just wrapped up The Carved Brush, an exhibition of Baishi’s artworks!

Anyway, here’s some backstory on this fantastic painting.

wildstaronline

lywen asked:

Can I just say that I love how you guys have a tumblr? Because I do. So much. I haven't really seen another game company utilize it as you guys have done, and it's great how you highlight things that the community makes here. So keep on being awesome, k? <3

wildstaronline answered:

We get a lot of messages like these, and we just wanted to take the time to publicly say THANK YOU. You guys are seriously so, so awesome — You’re the number 1 reason this tumblr exists.

Thank you for playing the game. Thank you for making awesome fan works and being active in the community. And thanks for sending us questions and messages and encouraging words that continue to brighten our day every time we read them.

This is why everyone should try Wildstar. When I played WoW it was a nightmare to get a response let alone get a somewhat genuine answer to anything. Blizzard was horrible with their fan community. However, Wildstar has brought the community in and is accepting of pretty much anyone. I say ” pretty much anyone ” because I’m sure they’re like the rest of us and hate trolls.

science-junkie

NPR Science: Sorry, Lucy: The Myth Of The Misused Brain Is 100 Percent False

  • ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:
  • If you went to the movie theater this weekend, you might've caught the latest Scarlett Johansson action movie called "Lucy." It's about a woman who develops superpowers by harnessing the full potential of her brain.
  • (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
  • SCARLETT JOHANSSON: I'm able to do things I've never done before. I feel everything and I can control the elements around me.
  • UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's amazing.
  • WESTERVELT: You've probably heard this idea before. Most people only use 10% of their brains. The other 90% of the basically dormant. Well, in the movie "Lucy," Morgan Freeman gives us this what-if scenario?
  • (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
  • MORGAN FREEMAN: What if there was a way of accessing 100% of our brain? What might we be capable of?
  • DAVID EAGLEMAN: We would be capable of exactly what we're doing now, which is to say, we do use a hundred percent of our brain.
  • WESTERVELT: That is David Eagleman.
  • EAGLEMAN: I'm a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine.
  • WESTERVELT: And he says, basically, all of us are like Lucy. We use all of our brains, all of time.
  • EAGLEMAN: Even when you're just sitting around doing nothing your brain is screaming with activity all the time, around the clock; even when you're asleep it's screaming with activity.
  • WESTERVELT: In other words, this is a total myth. Very wrong, but still very popular. Take this clip from an Ellen DeGeneres stand-up special.
  • (SOUNDBITE OF STAND-UP SPECIAL)
  • ELLEN DEGENERES: It's true, they say we use ten percent of our brain. Ten percent of our brain. And I think, imagine what we could accomplish if we used the other 60 percent? Do you know what I'm saying?
  • AUDIENCE: (LAUGHTER).
  • (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
  • DAVID SPADE: Let's say the average person uses ten percent of their brain.
  • WESTERVELT: It's even in the movie "Tommy Boy."
  • (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
  • SPADE: How much do you use? One and a half percent. The rest is clogged with malted hops and bong residue.
  • WESTERVELT: Ariana Anderson is a researcher at UCLA. She looks at brain scans all day long. And she says, if someone were actually using just ten percent of their brain capacity...
  • ARIANA ANDERSON: Well, they would probably be declared brain-dead.
  • WESTERVELT: Sorry, "Tommy Boy." No one knows exactly where this myth came from but it's been around since at least the early 1900's. So why is this wrong idea still so popular?
  • ANDERSON: Probably gives us some sort of hope that if we are doing things we shouldn't do, such as watching too much TV, alcohol abuse, well, it might be damaging our brain but it's probably damaging the 90 percent that we don't use. And that's not true. Whenever you're doing something that damages your brain, it's damaging something that's being used, and it's going to leave some sort of deficit behind.
  • EAGLEMAN: For a long time I've wondered, why is this such a sticky myth?
  • WESTERVELT: Again, David Eagleman.
  • EAGLEMAN: And I think it's because it gives us a sense that there's something there to be unlocked, that we could be so much better than we could. And really, this has the same appeal as any fairytale or superhero story. I mean, it's the neural equivalent to Peter Parker becoming Spiderman.
  • WESTERVELT: In other words, it's an idea that belongs in Hollywood.
juliedillon
juliedillon:

gilbo-shu-59:

juliedillon:

New Illustration: Space Sirens
The last remaining astronaut watched helplessly as his comrades left the ship one by one and were carried away deeper into the nebula. He told himself that he would not succumb the way his shipmates had; he knew he would struggle. But the creatures, if they could even be called that, somehow seemed to know him, and when his turn came and the singing of the cosmos reached a crescendo in his ears, his mind emptied of all but the desire to join them in the void. Gazing into the creature’s face, he mused on how tender, how gentle its embrace seemed to be, and even as his oxygen supply dwindled he did not resist. 

———————————
#holy cow #i actually thought this guy was Cas because at first glance he looks a bit like him #so of course i’m imagining a destiel au right now #with space siren!Dean #art

Normally I’d be like, “sheesh, fandom hijacking another post” except that I did kind of use a screencap of Castiel for face reference, so there you go. X) 

juliedillon:

gilbo-shu-59:

juliedillon:

New Illustration: Space Sirens

The last remaining astronaut watched helplessly as his comrades left the ship one by one and were carried away deeper into the nebula. He told himself that he would not succumb the way his shipmates had; he knew he would struggle. But the creatures, if they could even be called that, somehow seemed to know him, and when his turn came and the singing of the cosmos reached a crescendo in his ears, his mind emptied of all but the desire to join them in the void. Gazing into the creature’s face, he mused on how tender, how gentle its embrace seemed to be, and even as his oxygen supply dwindled he did not resist. 

———————————

#holy cow #i actually thought this guy was Cas because at first glance he looks a bit like him #so of course i’m imagining a destiel au right now #with space siren!Dean #art

Normally I’d be like, “sheesh, fandom hijacking another post” except that I did kind of use a screencap of Castiel for face reference, so there you go. X) 

astronomicalwonders
astronomicalwonders:

Pillars in the Carina Nebula
These one-light-year-tall pillars of cold hydrogen and dust, imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope, are located in the Carina Nebula. Violent stellar winds and powerful radiation from massive stars are sculpting the surrounding nebula. Inside the dense structures, new stars may be born.
This image of dust pillars in the Carina Nebula is a composite of 2005 observations taken of the region in hydrogen light (light emitted by hydrogen atoms) along with 2010 observations taken in oxygen light (light emitted by oxygen atoms), both times with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. The immense Carina Nebula is an estimated 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina.
Credit: NASA/Hubble

astronomicalwonders:

Pillars in the Carina Nebula

These one-light-year-tall pillars of cold hydrogen and dust, imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope, are located in the Carina Nebula. Violent stellar winds and powerful radiation from massive stars are sculpting the surrounding nebula. Inside the dense structures, new stars may be born.

This image of dust pillars in the Carina Nebula is a composite of 2005 observations taken of the region in hydrogen light (light emitted by hydrogen atoms) along with 2010 observations taken in oxygen light (light emitted by oxygen atoms), both times with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. The immense Carina Nebula is an estimated 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina.

Credit: NASA/Hubble